• A Tunisian man suspected of being an Islamist terrorist, who once served as Osama bin Laden’s bodyguard, is in detention in Germany pending deportation to Tunisia, a spokesman for the city of Bochum said on Tuesday. The case of Sami A. sparked outrage in April after German media reported he was receiving welfare benefits even though intelligence agencies had classified him as a potential threat.
  • The Taliban on Monday rejected pleas by Afghan elders and activists for an extension of this month’s ceasefire and said they amounted to a call for surrender to foreign forces, as local groups continued to push for an end to fighting. Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid dismissed the peace “slogans” and urged civil society activists and others not to join movements he said played into the hands of U.S. and international forces the Taliban wants to force from the country.
  • Forces backed by a Saudi-led coalition have killed eight members of Lebanon’s Iranian-backed Hezbollah terrorist group in Yemen in battles with the Iran-aligned Houthis, the coalition said on Monday. Hezbollah has previously denied Saudi accusations that the Shi’ite Muslim group is helping Houthi rebels in the Yemen conflict, which has become a proxy war between Saudi Arabia and Iran.
  • A British man has been found guilty of planning a terror attack in Westminster and making bombs for the Taliban. Khalid Ali, 28, was arrested in April 2017 in Parliament Street, where he was caught carrying three knives. Ali had recently returned from Afghanistan, where he made and detonated bombs.
  • Israeli aircraft and a tank struck a vehicle belonging to an operative of the Islamist Hamas terrorist group that dominates the Gaza Strip, as terrorists launched rockets into Israel, the Israeli military said on Wednesday. No Israeli casualties and no damage were reported in Israel after air-raid sirens sounded in communities around the Gaza Strip in the pre-dawn hours of Wednesday.
  • The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld the travel ban targeting several Muslim-majority countries and rejecting the argument that it represented unconstitutional religious discrimination. President Trump has said the travel ban is needed to protect the United States against attacks by Islamist terrorists.
  • Three members of the IRGC and three terrorists have been killed in a clash in the southeast of the country near the border with Pakistan, Iran’s state media report. A Sunni terrorist group called Jaish al-Adl (Army of Justice) claimed that its fighters killed 11 IRGC members.
  • The disputed territories between the Iraqi central government and autonomous Kurdistan region in the northeast of the country have recently witnessed a rise in ISIS attacks, foreshadowing long-term security threats and forcing people from dozens of villages to flee their homes. During his weekly press conference Tuesday, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said the desolate terrain of the region, heavily planted with landmines, was to blame for providing a suitable hideout for the ISIS cell.
  • Al Qaeda’s branch in Somalia, al Shabaab detonated an IED targeting an African Union Mission in Somalia convoy in Balad town, Middle Shabelle region on June 25. Al Shabaab terrorists killed two Burundian soldiers and injured 15 others. Al Shabaab claimed the attack.
  • Indonesia’s counter-terrorism police plan to arrest more than 100 suspected terrorists in a bid to prevent retaliatory attacks after a radical cleric linked to ISIS was sentenced to death, the country’s police chief said on Thursday. Aman Abdurrahman, regarded as the ideological leader of Jemaah Ansharut Daulah, a loose grouping of hundreds of ISIS sympathizers, was convicted last month for masterminding four deadly attacks in Jakarta and elsewhere in Indonesia.
  • Pakistan has removed the leader of one of the country’s largest Islamist extremist groups from its terrorist watchlist while the Election Commission considers whether his group can field candidates in a general election next month, an official said on Thursday. Muhammad Ahmed Ludhianvi is head of Ahl-e-Sunnat Wal Jamaat (ASWJ), a radical Sunni group that has incited violence against Pakistan’s minority Shi’ite Muslims.
  • Ahmed Abu Khatallah, the organizer of the deadly Sept. 11, 2012, attack on U.S. diplomatic compounds in Benghazi, Libya, was sentenced on Wednesday to 22 years in prison on terrorism and other charges, the Justice Department said. Government evidence showed Khatallah led an extremist militia named Ubaydah bin Jarrah, which he directed to carry out the violence in Benghazi, the Justice Department said in a statement.
  • British spies were complicit in the mistreatment of hundreds of suspected terrorists by the United States and involved in dozens of cases of the illegal transfer of suspects, according to two reports by parliament. The Intelligence and Security Committee spent several years looking at the actions of British security and intelligence agencies in relation to the handling of detainees overseas following the Sept. 11 attacks in the United States.
  • The Iraqi Shia militia Liwa Zulfiqar, which is controlled by Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, released a picture of its forces in the southern Syria town of Busra al Harir. The photo offers first confirmed evidence of the Iraqi militia’s – and thereby Iran’s – involvement in the current Syrian offensive on rebel-held areas in southern Syria.
  • Egyptian police killed four suspected terrorists and captured two others accused of being involved in an attack on a local security chief two days before a presidential election in March, the interior ministry said on Thursday. Two policemen were killed in Alexandria when a bomb left under a car blew up as the Alexandria police chief, Major General Mostafa al-Nemr, drove past on March 24. He escaped unhurt.
  • A prosecutor in Israel filed an indictment on Thursday for attempted murder and terrorism against a Palestinian who stabbed and wounded 18-year-old Shuva Malka in Afula earlier this month. Malka has since recovered. The Shin Bet (Israel Security Agency) said that Nur al-Din Shinawi, a Jenin resident in his 20s, confessed to the attack.
  • Pakistan on Thursday confirmed it had been placed on the Financial Action Task Force's "gray list" over its alleged failure to choke off terror financing, although the global financial watchdog has not yet announced the decision. Earlier this year, the United States, France, Britain and Germany introduced a motion to the FATF, alleging Pakistan's failure to adhere to the international guidelines for curbing terror financing and money laundering.
  • Al Qaeda’s branch in Somalia, al Shabaab, terrorists killed a Somali National Army (SNA) soldier in Sinay junction, Yaqshid district, northeastern Mogadishu on June 27. The al Shabaab terrorists seized the soldier’s gun before leaving the scene.