• Twin blasts in the Afghan capital Kabul killed at least 26 people on Monday, including nine journalists who had arrived to report on the first explosion and were apparently targeted by a suicide bomber, officials said. ISIS claimed responsibility, a senior police official said.
  • A self-radicalized Sydney man stabbed his neighbor in an ISIS-inspired attack to avenge US bombings of his “brothers and sisters in Iraq”, a court was been told on Monday. Ihsas Khan pleaded not guilty on Monday to committing a terrorist act.
  • Missile strikes in Syria hit military bases used by Iran and its proxy militias, causing a blast large and killing at least 16 people, a conflict monitoring group and one of Iran’s regional allies said on Monday. There was no claim of responsibility for the strikes, but suspicion immediately fell on Israel, which has accused Iran of using the cover of Syria’s war to build a military infrastructure there to confront Israel and has vowed to prevent it from developing.
  • The headquarters coordinating the activities of American ground forces in Iraq closed down on Monday, marking the end of major combat operations against ISIS, said U.S. officials. Deactivating the Combined Joint Forces Land Component Command in Baghdad also signifies “the changing composition and responsibilities of the Coalition” to defeat Islamic State, according to the United States Central Command statement.
  • On Monday, a suicide bomber in a vehicle attacked a foreign military convoy in the southern province of Kandahar, Afghanistan, killing 11 children studying in a nearby religious school, police said. In addition, eight members of the NATO-led Resolute Support coalition were wounded, the force said.
  • Somali police say a suicide bomber has killed three police officers including a senior commander in the central city of Galkayo. Col. Ahmed Hashi says the bomber apparently was targeting the commander of a special police force tasked with the security of the divided city. Hashi says three other people were wounded in the blast. Al Qaeda’s branch in Somalia, al Shabaab, has claimed responsibility. 
  • The Group for Support of Islam and Muslims (JNIM), al Qaeda’s branch in West Africa, claimed on Friday that four suicide bombers were used in the April 14 suicide assault on the Timbuktu airport in Mali. One actual UN peacekeeper was killed, a Burkinabe, while at least 10 others were wounded during the assault. France confirmed seven of its soldiers were also wounded.
  • U.S.-backed Syrian militias on Tuesday relaunched their offensive to seize the last territory ISIS controls in the east near the border with Iraq. The Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), an alliance of Kurdish and Arab militias, had paused the battle after Turkey launched an assault in January against their northwestern Afrin region.
  • The Treasury Department announced on Monday that it has added Myrna Mabanza, an ISIS facilitator based in the Philippines, to the US government’s list of designated terrorists. Treasury identifies Mabanza as a woman in her mid-20s who has worked with some of ISIS’s most senior personnel in Southeast Asia.
  • A man charged with planning a terror attack in London has appeared in court. Lewis Ludlow, 26, is accused of researching potential targets, engaging in reconnaissance, and writing out attack plans. He is also accused of attempting to travel to join ISIS and of raising money for terrorist purposes, but he pleads not guilty.
  • The latest report by the Special Investigator General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) indicates that the Taliban’s control of districts as of the end of Jan. 2018 remains virtually unchanged. The Taliban continue to maintain its grip on half of Afghanistan, despite US military’s reinvigorated effort to force the group from its strongholds.
  • A group of terrorists including suicide bombers stormed the head offices of Libya’s electoral commission in Tripoli on Wednesday, killing at least 12 people and setting fire to the building, officials said. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attack, but it appeared aimed at derailing efforts to organize elections in Libya by the end of this year.
  • ISIS claimed responsibility on Wednesday for a deadly gun attack near the Iraqi town of Tarmiya. A security source said that terrorists killed eight unarmed civilians in the assault 25 km (15 miles) north of Baghdad on Tuesday.
  • Explosions in and around a mosque in northeast Nigeria killed at least 27 people on Tuesday, a hospital official said, in the latest in a spate of attacks by terrorists in the region. The blasts in the town of Mubi bore the hallmarks of Islamist terrorist group Boko Haram, which has waged an insurgency in Africa’s most populous country since 2009 and often deploys suicide bombers in crowded places.
  • A New Jersey man was sentenced to eight years in prison on Tuesday after he pleaded guilty to taking part in a conspiracy to support ISIS, federal prosecutors announced. He admitted that he made plans with several other young men to travel to the Middle East to join the terrorist group, prosecutors said.
  • Afghan security forces arrested seven suspected terrorists who were planning to attack a government-run hospital and an interior ministry office in the capital Kabul on Thursday, officials said. An NDS official said the seven youths were trained in different madrassas (religious schools) located in Chaman district, situated on the Afghanistan-Pakistan border.
  • A 17-year-old boy in Plano, Texas, has been arrested and charged with plotting a mass shooting inspired by ISIS at a shopping mall, law enforcement agencies said on Wednesday. The Federal Bureau of Investigation and police said high-school student Matin Azizi-Yarand had planned the attack for mid-May and had sought to recruit others for the shooting.
  • ISIS claimed responsibility for the deadly attack on Libya’s electoral commission in Tripoli on Wednesday. The attack, which killed 12, appeared aimed at derailing efforts to organize elections in Libya by the end of this year.
  • Suspected Islamist terrorists killed at least 16 Tuareg civilians in attacks in northern Mali, just days after 40 Tuaregs were killed during similar raids on neighboring villages, local authorities said on Wednesday. Violence has escalated in recent months as jihadist groups, once confined to the remote north of the west African state, have exploited ethnic tensions to recruit Fulani herders and extend their presence farther south.
  • The Basque terrorist group ETA said it has dissolved, bringing a formal end to half a century of assassinations and violence and leaving victims pressing for the investigation of hundreds of unsolved crimes. Spain’s interior minister said Madrid would continue to pursue ETA terrorists who remain at large, but didn’t say how many terrorists are still being sought.
  • A London man has denied plotting to kill Theresa May in a bomb attack. Naa'imur Zakariyah Rahman, 20, from Finchley is accused of preparing a terror attack targeting Downing Street. He is also charged with assisting Mohammad Aqib Imran, 22, from Birmingham, who allegedly tried to join ISIS and is charged with preparing acts of terror.
  • Unidentified gunmen kidnapped a German nurse from the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in the Somali capital, Mogadishu, on Wednesday night, police and the ICRC said. Abductions and killings of Somali aid workers are common in the Horn of Africa country, but targeting foreign workers has become less frequent in recent years as security has improved. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the abduction.
  • In March, an Iran state-affiliated media outlet inappropriately published a speech by Lebanese Hezbollah chief Hassan Nasrallah. After backlash in Arab media against the speech, including Nasrallah’s declaration of loyalty to Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei above all, the Iranian outlets retracted the article. The retraction and denial, however, strongly suggest a cover-up attempt. It was likely addressed to Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) personnel.
  • Two districts in Afghanistan previously assessed by Resolute Support as “influenced by the government of Afghanistan” are now at risk. Matta Khan in Paktika province in eastern Afghanistan, and Tashkan in Badakhshan in the north, are now contested districts by the Taliban.